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to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sw
assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are r
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
and insulatedding old buildings and creating renewable energy economy like they have done in germany. they have 50% renewables. all of germany is 25-30% renewables. that's mostly solar. germany has less sun than much of america. the idea that is not an economic solution is a complete falsity. we're totally at the point we can do this right now. i think the, you know, we're really in a situation where there's an old paradigm, the oh oh post oil revolution, industry which is very powerful and strong, perhaps the strongest in the world. they obviously want to continue to do things within their paradigm and with their own interests in mind. that's how the free market works, i guess but we have to enlighten the people and make them understand there is nothing safe about this. it's just as dirty as coal, it's going to cause climate change. it's not which fossil fuel we like. this is all about climate change and obviously having clean air and water is important but if we tip the earth into unlivable environment, everybody suffers. in fact, a lot of us are going to perish. so, you know, it seems overly dr
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. they were looking after their only tribal interests, they were not patriotic, and in a funny way he accused the jews of everything that billy graham's and protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time and those who opposed his son's election because he was roman catholic he said you couldn't be a catholic and a true blooded american at the same time because they couldn't turn him down. is it true kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his bootblack one day was giving him advice on the marquette and supposedly kennedy had said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when they give me advice? >> it's a great story. i found no evidence. it may be true. there are some stories they found no evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify it. but kennedy didn't need it to tell him that. kennedy was really smart. and when you look back at the crash of 1929, as wh
catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over e
there's not much growth to be expected from all europe. you know, obviously core europe like germany will grow with the global economy here. but at the moment, because of the issues in japan and all the issues in the u.s., europe and particularly euro is the one to send out is the strong demand. this is something that european policies and that european companies will need to work with. >> next year, although the eurozone economy is stag nating, we do expect a recovery in the global economy to which europe corporate sector is very well levered. it's that recover in the global back drop which allows margins to rise a little bit in eurozone, gives some type line growth and overall profit growth we think of around 9%. >> standing out in 2013, the biggest uncertainty right now has to do with around the housing market in the united states. some people are increasing their belief that you're going to see growth in the housing market from, you know, previous estimates are like 1.5% to % or even 4%. that is the unknown. because as everybody knows, housing has so many secondary and tertiary e
against germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. he believed they were warmongers and looking after only their own tribal interests. they were not patriotic. and a funny way, he accused the jewish of every day but billy graham and protestants accused his son a but he ran for presidency in the 1960s. he didn't believe those possible to be a jew and a true peace treaty at the same time as those who oppose to send selection, because he was roman catholic said that the late graham among them were right out there in front, said that you couldn't be a catholic in true blooded american at the same time the vatican would give the lawyers that could turn them down. >> is it true that kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced who's giving advice on the market is supposed to kennedy said on its way to his office he thought something was wrong to give me advice. >> it's a great story. i saw no evidence for it. it may be true. there's some stories i found a evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify. but kennedy was really smart. when you loo
germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get i
's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the last couple of years. it is on the public sector side but also an example of what kind of pay hikes we may see flowing through to the german economy. if that helps support spending, despite weak industrial production figures and concern about growth prospects, there may be some rebalancing toward the german consumer taking on more of the heavy lifting across the eurozone. so one to keep an eye on, guys. >> thank you very much. we shouldn't see that as the unions pressuring -- they probably are pressuring for higher wages, but there's been pressure on germany to drive more inflation in germany to help lift the
" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stuningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like america too. >> politics dem nie
of the most successful year over year appreciations of any developed country's equity markets? >> germany. >> bingo. i think of their own currency it's up like 30%. let's keep going. >> okay. so germany has been the engine of european growth. if germany slows down, the dynamic in europe is going to change dramatically. if this euro/yen goes through let's say 120, 125, 130 which is what they're pushing for, the german auto sector which has made great inroads against the japanese because the euro/yen as the japanese have held the yen has been over valued that is going to change the whole european dynamic. a slowing germany will become a wild card. that's my call for the biggest wild card in 2013. >> i tell you what. you have to go nose to nose with a country on the foreign exchange front, i think the japanese are going to be well matched with the mentality of what is going on in germany. listen, merry christmas. i know hannukah is over and you had a great hannukah. >> thank you. >> best holiday wishes to all the viewership from two old time traders. back to you. >> two of the best that is.
everything they possibly could to push the united states into war against germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. he believed the jews were warmongers, they were looking after only their own tribal interests, they were not patriotic. in a funny way, he accused the jews of everything that billy graham and the protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time. and those who opposed his son's election because he was a roman catholic said that, billy graham among them, norman vincent peel right out there in front, said that you couldn't be a catholic and a true-blooded american at the same time. because the vatican was going to give you orders, and you couldn't turn them down. over here. >> is it true that kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his -- [inaudible] one day who was giving him advice on the market and supposedly kennedy has said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when a boot black can give me advice? >> yeah, it's
's a billion more tons than china tops the list as the biggest polluter. the u.s. and germany are the only countries that reduced their emission. and the twilight saga "breaking dawn part ii" still rules at the box office. the vampire flick took top honors for the third week in a row bringing in $17.4 million. "skyfall" came in a very close second with $17 million and in third place, spielberg's "lincoln" barely beat out "rise of the guardian." i have a date for that movie. >> a lot of good movies at the box office for the kids and adults. >> absolutely. >>> coming up your monday morning weather and in sports, is he lucky or just good? down to his final option the colts andrew luck socks the lions with no time on the clock. colts andrew socks the lions with no time on the clock. want to give your family more vitamins, omega 3s, and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. it's eb. is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. c
in germany as i understand a shout out to all my family in trenton, new jersey. i miss y'all and love y'all. if you missed it, sorry. did high part. you should have watched it. bye-bye. price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. yes, you could. we actully keep track of how many times this kid picked his nose? hair pulls, stink
call. asia was up 13. europe was up 12. adding employees to europe, france, germany, very strong. similar to what bill mcdermott has been saying. we are all so doom and gloom about europe, ellison's talking about it's a bright spot. >> what about germany today, up again for december, as we mentioned at the top of the show, above $1.33 a day. something's going on there. the big upgrade on greece. that's kind of strange, right? >> up four or five notches. >> i have to stand up for a second. $8. >> is it finally time? >> i want to click my heels, but these are soft reeboks. you wouldn't hear it. >> are we going to see that, finally, at last? >> the way people were coming on and saying it's going to zero. >> running for the exit. >> when was the euro dissolved and greece kicked out? what was the date? >> it happened just in reverse. >> it was overnight. >> we'll see. i can't believe 2013 will not hold a couple of moments where we go, ah. but it is amazing. nothing we can do. >> we're afraid spain is going to come -- spain was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens wh
this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [la
cyanide. >>> germany's cabinet approving of delivery of patriot missiles to turkey, the move aimed to protect the nato member against possible syrian attacks. the western alliance decided to okay the move after mortar rounds and shells from syria killed five turks. the missiles are expected to arrive in turkey in five months. >>> the briefing on the situation in north korea as the rogue nation plans to launch a long-range missile. the nuclear armed regime claims they're just sending a satellite into orbit. washington sees it as a cover for missile tests possibly aimed at the u.s. those are the headlines, pretty serious ones at that. back to tracy. tracy: sure are. tracy, thank you very much. >>> smith & wesson reporting qarlt early results amid surging results in u.s. will they shoot a bull's-eye? they have rockin' black friday sales. >> unbelievable. gun applications way up. gun sales way up. particularly since the beginning of president obama's first term. there is lot of concern about gun laws and will our rights to own and bear arms go away? people have been buying up the guns.
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
the relevant approval from the parliament in question expect bid germany and the netherlands. turkey will receive several of the models which is designed to intercept incoming missiles and several hundred nato troops will be deployed to separate them and will be under the command of nato supreme allied commander in europe. any deployment will be defensive only. it will in no way support a in fly zone or any offensive operation. >> syria possessions missiles. we know they have the chemical weapons. of course, they also would have to be included in our calculations. this is will the reason why it is a matter of urgency to ensure effective defensive protection of our ally, turkey. >>reporter: these missile batteries will be programmed only to intercept missiles coming from syria which will be in operation in a few weeks. >>shepard: the syrian president is being wanted not to use the weapons but are there signs he could be getting the message? >>reporter: the white house press secretary seems to think so. >> the president spoke of this explicitly and we had this conversation yesterday ab
. she has stage four cancer. we have to go. get her to 250,000. before she goes to germany for more treatment. there is an election in louisiana.
2007. but prior to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89. and before that worked in the state department assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs from 1983-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and imminent involvement in these issues. and, finally, last but not least, ambassador matlock known to many of us, career ambassador. he's been holding a series of academic posted i'm not going to list them all, since 1991. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991. as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. and i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time. but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of co
numbers of irish people and germans who are coming here because of terrible economic situations in germany. and others coming into the united states and posing a lot of problems a lot of people in the northeast, especially in terms of assimilation. a lot of those immigrants go and fight in the u.s. mexico border. the reason they do that is because they don't have opportunities economically in the united states. for the most part, they are not very good soldiers. the san patricio -- those are the deserters from the mexican war. some people think that they were irish because they carry an irish line. but the san patricio's, one can mostly say is that they were mostly catholic. one thing i did didn't talk about in the story is there is an intense tension between the catholicism of mexico and the mainstream protestant beliefs of most americans. a lot of americans actually go to mexico and think that they are going to convert catholics or regain catholicism and basically get red of the catholic thread. i was lucky enough to have a student that was a graduate student who could read german and he
them in germany but you can only shoot three bullets and then have to reload to prevent these kind of tragedies. >> there was also a similar incidence in china of someone going in but they didn't have a gun so nobody died. it happened on the exact same day. >> stephanie: if we all go to our regular talking points, we're never going to get anything done. all of those catchphrases, guns don't kill people, all of that stuff, there is something we can do. and i honestly feel like everything's a part of it. mental health, cutbacks that affect mental health. obviously guns. senator feinstein's bill should be the start of what we do. absolutely we should ban assault weapons and the clips and close the loophole at gun shows. >> a woman was calling said her granddaughter's school has bulletproof glass and metal doors. you can't get in. >> stephanie: louis gohmert on cue, we need teachers armed. we need more guns. >> we need 6-year-olds armed. >> stephanie: seriously first grade principals, we need them armed like rambo?
have friends germany. he's 16 hours ahead. and he's still there. >> the end of the world? i think i can't talk about it. >> have you heard that? >> yes. yes. >> no big plans? >> no big plans. too late now. >> the white house doesn't believe that the world is ending. they're getting ready for inauguration, more than a month away. >> the world? no longer ends. the end of the world is tomorrow. >> oh, oh. i got it. okay. >> all gone. what do you think? >> i don't believe that. >> do you think you need to keep running and getting thin considering the world ends tomorrow? >> yes. i try. >> greta: that is your last call. we're closing down shop. time for me to go to bed. before we go a quick look at a fox tile we take a look back at one of the bizarre kidnappings in history, 1963 kidnapping of frank sinatra, junior. plus, the four legged heroes working hard to protect our troops. i take you inside of the world to super dogs to find out what it takes to train these dogs to meet tern concerns of today. >> some dogs go on to be law enforcement dogs. >> greta: this canine responded to the newtown
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at germany. a lot of -- >> hong kong, germany, you name it. >> germany up 29% year-to-date. that has a lot to do with the ucb and the eurozone. this is a relative gain. lost in this conversation for a lot of u.s. investors, they are u.s. investors. they can't really invest globally to the same degree that we talk about, we say germany is up 29%, for a lot of investors that's out of their reach. >> if we didn't have the cliff today, we would have best trades of the year, jamie dimon buying jpmorgan when the whale hit. things looked really dark. some of the best trades happened obviously when it looked like the stocks were in for real trouble. >> look at the greek stock market. look at greek debt. i think it was third point that established a prominent position in greek debt and saw x number of returns thereafter. >> draw the lessons to today. as we teeter on the cliff, what would be the fear trade that people are shunning right now but may turn out to be the best trade looking back? >> i think it's something we already mentioned, and that's the defense sector. >> the sequestration sector is
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. but a dog knows absolutely instantly when -- instantly. when we lived in germany -- germany, my father was working there, all the police had trained doings on the place and there were no robberies, there were no assaults because people knew that that dog would get them and obviously the security is not working. and children need to be protected. adults need to be protected. and it would be much less expensive and much safer to have a trained dog in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: ok, sara, we got your point. john? guest: i'm not sure if it would be less expensive to have a handler and a dog at every school rather than allowing one person to possess a gun they probably own pivetly, having said that, it's an unfortunate fact i grew up much of my early years in europe and you know, i understand that they had strict gun control laws there. until last friday, the newtown shoot, the top three, in terms of fatality, school shootings in the world were in britain and germany. those were done with assault weapons. just because you have strict gun controls doesn't mean
at this hour, there they, they're all down. not great in france, but germany down about .7% and the ftse down fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's
. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. >>> trip adviser and deutsche bank. >> deutsche bank likes this company. people love it. trip adviser is king. >> deutsche buying a hold on apache. >> apache has been such a dog. bad for apache. >> an a darko? >> ever since the daily, and other litigation, this is an inexpensive stock. i-like it. >> deutsche on omc. >> what's interesting, they're talking about negative momentum in ad
. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other brand. you can say, jim, that's not even -- i mean, what percent -- i am a real fan customer for kirkland.
%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on the weakening of the yen which we can show you on hopes that that will help the japanese corporate sector. remember, we saw export figures showing a drop of 20% in exports to the use. 15% to china. again, there's a lot of expectation built to this. the aussie/dollar remains the underperformer as we continue to evaluate china's internal rebalancing. now the sterling is stronger, the dollar/yen you already mentioned. and the euro/dollar to get back to the point about the ifo survey is adding .3% to 132.-- 1.3274. we get a rally in the euro. our guest this morning suggested it will be the 150 to 160 range before that beco
the same levels of investment support that even germany and japan have. but the fact that secretary clinton has been very pro business, that the state department opens up doors, that the president publicly says i want to double exports, that the u.s. is very aggressive in trying to do that, i think attitude helps us all. it's really a -- you know, when chancellor merkel flies from berlin to beijing, 20 c.e.o.s get off right behind her and they've got their hands out, right? and they're saying "give me more business." and we don't need to do it exactly that way but we need the administration, every administration, to be out there selling with us as we go around the world. look, for every job that we have in export there is's another eight in the supply chain. every small and medium supplier benefits as we go sell. >> rose: you mentioned the president. you have developed -- how would you characterize the relationship? you're on the jobs and you're on the debt commission, he clearly respects you. what's the relationship? >> i think strong -- very strong mutual respect. phenomenon a way that we
, in germany, in france, in south korea, in japan, all of whom have very strong gun control laws, you see that there are probably somewhere between maybe only a couple dozen to a couple hundred handgun related deaths a year. so we have a handgun vie -- a gun violence epidemic in this country that's unlike what is occurring anywhere else amongst our industrial counterparts, and you consider the arguments that the nra makes, the principal argument they have made to hold up legislation for 15 years is people need guns in their homes for self-defense. this has been studied by countless study all of which have found the same thing. guns inside the home are used very, very frequently, a tiny percentage of instances. almost all the times when guns inside a home are used, they are used in a suicide or in a homicide or some other kind of assault. and i remember when we were trying to get gun violence legislation passed in the wake of columbine. i remember being invited to meet with president clinton inside the oval office, and he said to me as we were walking out the door that day, he said, you kn
, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> shepard: there is brand new drama in the fiscal cliff standoff. whoops. house republicans are supposed to be voting on part 2 of what they call plan b. they passed part 1 of that earlier but just barely. then they took some kind of recess and as you can see, they haven't come back. mike emanuel is there. is this an oops? >> shep, it's clearly says that they are worried about whether they have the votes. this is the part of plan b that would raise taxes on those making more than a million dollars a year. some republicans say they were not elected to raise taxes on anybody and so they have had experience it been getting pounded by outside conservative groups that have been saying by republican members who say if you v
taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, for sure he's paying more. but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high-quality. he gets a free education. from kindergarten through any master's bachelor's ph.d. program he wants and it's pretty high quality as well. he gets free retraining if he ever loses his job. he gets all the benefits like day care and things like that europe is famous for. and the person in the united states may be spending a couple of percentage points lower. but he has to save for health care. he has to save for long-term care when he gets old. he has to save for his children's college education. perhaps for high school education. and certainly for any kind of retraining he may need. so it's not entirely clear that europeans have such a bad deal. >> the question here, it is a tough decision. we are deciding
to germany as an enlisted man. he insisted on going to vietnam where he faced serious combat. i just think he brings to it first vietnam veteran to be secretary of defense and the only enlisted man ever to be secretary of defense. i think those are credentials that are needed. >> woodruff: any thoughts on this. >> i think some people say the trial balloons are a sign of presidential weak finance they don't go up. they're not really. they're actually a smart way for the president to engage in this i think the opposition to hagel is growing. i think it is rooted in disagreements not just about israel but about defence cuts. but about his ease on iran which are significantly to the left of president. and because he doesn't have a lot of respect of former colleagues here which are chrorming out, and many of them in opposition. i think it's an unlikely nomination. >> woodruff: we return you both to the gun control discussion. we heard from the head of the nra, mark, today, wayne la pierre who is advocating putting an armed guard in every school. the president launched a task force this week. where
than usual in berlin germany for those who take an annual christmas day plunge into icy waters. some wore little more than santa hats. stil >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, contests to watch in three states; screening for breast cancer; getting ready for the new health care law; civilians keeping the peace in the philippines; corruption in china; and writing verse about greece's troubled times. but first, with the other news of the day, here's kwame holman. >> holman: police in webster, new york, found human remains today in the burned-out home where a gunman ambushed firefighters on christmas eve. the victim appeared to be william spengler's sister. he left a note saying he wanted to burn down the neighborhood and kill people. spengler set fire to his house, then shot four firefighters-- killing two-- before killing himself. he had a revolver, a shotgun, and a bushmaster rifle, the same model used in the newtown school shooting. >> i can't tell you at this time what the victims were shot with. we assume it was the rifle because of the distance. it's going to go to the medica
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